IoT and the Aerospace Industry – Too Risky?

March 2nd, 2022

Internet of things (IoT) is revolutionizing the aerospace industry and the way it communicates, and there are many applications of IoT in the aerospace industry as new space crafts and their controls are being brought online rapidly. Here is everything you need to know about IoT, its security, and how it can be used in the aerospace industry. 

What Is the Internet of Things 

IoT consists of internet-connected devices that perform daily functions other than personal computing, and the number of IoT devices has grown to 12.3 billion globally. Chances are, you interact with an IoT device at least once a day, whether it’s your smart home assistant, your smart lights, your smart TV, your smart refrigerator, or your smart phone – IoT devices are all around us. 

What IoT devices provide is connectivity and adaptability. IoT devices are built to integrate with one another and coordinate with one another when prompted to, in order to conduct certain functions. With the direct data connectivity of the internet, devices can be synchronized to optimize their performance. Further, with internet connection, devices can receive software and firmware updates automatically. 

All this means that IoT devices can network to create an entire IoT system for your home, office, or even in this case, space mission. With data coursing between devices, you can automate processes that previously took painstaking manual synchronization. With IoT the devices have embedded sensors that allow them to connect to their counterparts. 

Aerospace IoT Applications 

With the amount of data traversing between components, it’s only natural that the aerospace industry would be a prime candidate for IoT device usage. From control boards to sensors, IoT devices have been finding their way into every facet of aerospace design. 

Aerospace IoT applications largely replace the radio or microwave transmissions of analog equipment. This is beneficial when it comes to space missions, because sensor gauge data can be automatically transmitted to mission control without needing to be readout. By automating the readout process, your team can cut down on take-off times and inspections. This is incredibly important when it comes to launches, because the conditions for an aerospace launch are incredibly specific and delays can be significant if systems are not ready on time. Additionally, it is crucial to have proper sensor gauge data to guarantee that the aerospace systems are operating to their correct and full capacity. IoT streamlines data transmission, which reduces the margin of error significantly due to its sophistication, making aerospace operations run smoothly. 

Security Challenges of IoT Applications 

While the use of IoT devices can help streamline inspections and take-off procedures, it is also important to note the risks that come along with going digital. Unlike radio signals, internet connections allow attackers to connect their computer directly to your systems. Although radio systems technically can be hacked, to carry out such a hack requires knowledge from technical manuals that are difficult, if not impossible, to access as well as equipment that may be equally difficult to procure. 

By contrast, computer hacks are far more common and tools for hacking are available for sale to anyone who’s willing to pay. Thus, IoT devices are necessarily a target for hackers because these devices can’t usually be equipped with anti-malware apps, which means they are far more vulnerable than personal computing devices. 

However, it is also important to note that the risk of cyber security breaches exists when any form of internet or network based technology is involved, and should not deter the incorporation of it into the aerospace industry. Likewise, there has already been extensive research into how to prevent and recover from attacks on IoT devices. These methods include ensuring that you choose products from reputable brands with good cybersecurity practices, as well as conducting regular security updates to ensure that your systems are not vulnerable. 

Otherwise, your other option is to secure the IoT devices within your network and to secure the networks that they’re on. However, this will require at the very least a network firewall and probably an intrusion prevention system as well. This will prevent hackers from getting onto your network, which keeps them from getting to your devices.  

Either way, IoT devices do have the inherit risk of cyber-attack, but any internet connected network and system is vulnerable to attack. Using IoT technology in the aerospace industry can pose incredible benefits when it comes to gathering and transmitting crucial data to aerospace operations. 

Integrating IoT Devices with Legacy Technology 

Not every aerospace enterprise can afford to overhaul and secure their entire system at once. It is more likely that IoT devices will slowly replace legacy components and will need to be integrated into the older “legacy” systems. 

This may require some degree of creativity to accomplish, and at EPTAC we provide trainings for specialists and instructors in building and inspecting electronic assemblies, including IoT devices. Our IPC-7711/7721 course on reworked assemblies is perfect for training staff at aerospace enterprises to integrate IoT devices into legacy systems. 

About EPTAC        

For over 30 years, EPTAC has been a leading provider of solder training and IPC certification. We provide professionals with the tools and training they need to advance their careers and improve their businesses. With 19 locations across North America, our solutions and instructional staff provide easy access to knowledge that will enhance your business model and help you meet and exceed industry demands. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.   

 

Leaded vs. Lead-Free Solder: Which is Better?

January 1st, 2022

Leaded solder has been the preferred material for electronic manufacturing for decades due to its low cost, lower melting point, and ease of use. However, there has been heightened concerns about the health and environment effects of lead solder, particularly when used in electronics. In 2006 the European Union banned certain hazardous substances in electronic products, including lead. In the past two decades, the electronic manufacturing world has experienced a dynamic development of alternative soldering material centered on tin metal with manufacturers switching to lead-free solder alternative in order to eradicate lead from electronic production. But what’s the right choice? Which is better for electronic manufacturing: lead or lead-free-solder?

Lead-Free vs. Leaded Solder
Generally, leaded solder is composed of tin and lead. The advantages of using leaded solder include: easier to bring to working temperature, shock resistant, and fewer internal flaws in the structure after cooled. However, lead material is harmful to the body as it’s readily absorbed.

Lead-free solder has a higher melting point at 217°C compared to 183°C for lead alloys. This makes lead-free solder more challenging to work with. The most common lead-free solder mix is tin-copper, which has a melting point of 217°C and mixes 99.3% tin with 0.7% copper. However, the main reason why manufacturers are shifting to the use of lead-free solder is to eradicate lead from electronic production and waste recycling processes.

Cost
Leaded solder is more cost-effective than lead-free solders because lead is much cheaper than alternative alloys. Lead is barely one-tenth the price of tin, making leaded solder easily affordable. Furthermore, some manufacturers replace tin with silver as their lead alternative in lead-free solders, making them even more expensive.

Environmental Concerns
Companies who value environmental conservation state that the main reason for embracing lead-free soldering is because of the poisonous nature of lead. Lead can indeed accumulate in the human body even from small prolonged exposures. Furthermore, lead can quickly enter your body through the skin, mouth, or nose. However, the amount of lead on solders is too insignificant to cause severe health problems.

Which Solder is Better?
Leaded solder is easier to use, has a lower melting point, is low cost, and causes fewer quality problems with the joints than lead-free solder, however; the continued efforts to take lead out of all electronic products in the United States means that leaded solder could be obsolete in the next 10 years in numerous commercial applications. Generally, it is more economical and effective to use lead solder because of its unique properties and benefits. There continues to be some industries that use leaded solders because of these properties and benefits. The primary reason you should opt for lead-free solders, if you are able to, is if your government prohibits lead to be used in products, or if you are working to be an Environmental, Social, and Corporate Governance (ESG) company.

All sectors that use solder in large quantities are likely to shift to lead-free soldering soon if they have not done so yet. The paint and gasoline sectors have both gone lead-free. As manufacturers begin to shift away from leaded solder, make sure you are up to date on your training and learn more about lead-free and leaded soldering from industry experts with EPTAC. With high-level soldering courses, you can get hands-on experience from instructors who know the industry inside and out. Further your soldering education with online training courses from EPTAC.

About EPTAC
EPTAC is an internationally recognized leader in solder training and IPC certification, providing professionals with the skills to accelerate their careers, and businesses, the talent to succeed. For over 30 years, EPTAC has been helping corporations increase quality standards, improve productivity, and maximize profits. With nineteen (19) locations in North America, EPTAC continues to expand its offerings and exceptional instructional staff to provide easy access to knowledge and skill-based programs when and where industry demands it. Access our scheduled programs through our website or schedule your own corporate on-site training. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.

The 5 Essential Tools for Soldering

December 1st, 2021

Soldering is an element that is used widely throughout the electronics industry. It is the joining process used to fuse different types of metals together by melting solder. Solder is a metal alloy usually constructed of tin and lead and is melted by using a hot iron. The hot iron is heated to temperatures above 600 degrees Fahrenheit, which eventually cools and creates a strong electrical bond. When soldering, it is crucial to have the essential tools you need in order to produce a successful product. Let’s explore 5 of those essential tools.

Solder
Solder is essential to any soldering project because it is the filler material that melts and joins the two materials together. Keep in mind that the solder should have a lower melting point than the materials that are being joined. This will allow the solder to melt first and bond the materials together. Solders can be made with or without lead and based on what kind of materials you’ll be soldering, solder with a lower melting point is the best.

Soldering Iron
There are many types of soldering irons. For most projects it is essential to use a pencil-style soldering iron because they allow you to solder small connections and components without having to use an expensive, bulky tool or station. When using a pencil-style soldering iron, it is recommended that it is 25 watts or more. Using an under-powered iron, less than 25 watts, will cost you more in the long run due to ruined products and damaged components. Under-powered irons also take longer to heat the joint, potentially overheating the component being soldered and cause damage. A soldering pencil is used for soldering small metallic elements and electrical components. The finer point helps with detailed and microscopic works. Soldering tips could also help with precise, detailed work as they come in several different shapes and sizes, suitable for many types of soldering.

Soldering Wick
Nobody is perfect, and mistakes are bound to happen. That’s where the soldering wick comes in. A soldering wick serves as a de-soldering tool. It’s made up by intertwining copper wires together. These wires, when heated, allow you to make alterations to joints you have already soldered. When placing the tip of the soldering wick to heat, the wick melts the solder and absorbs it. Once the portion of the soldering wick is covered with solder, it will need to be removed and repeated until all the solder is gone.

Magnifying Glass
Soldering requires a high level of precision that is not possible with just the naked eye. It is essential to have a magnifying glass, microscope, or some sort of magnification device on hand in order to see your electronic component’s parts clearly. Here are a few different magnifying glasses that are beneficial for soldering.

Soldering Helping Hands
The helping hands magnifying glass has hand-like crutches that can hold wires when you are soldering. Some can have two hands, and some may have four depending on the model and your preference. You can also use the hands to place the soldering iron you’re working on.

Magnifying Goggles
You can also wear magnifying goggles efficiently around your head when soldering. Some even come with a built-in LED light. While some offer 5 or 6 LEDs, there are some that offer 30 or 40 LEDs for excellent lighting along with high magnification.

Wire Cutters
When soldering, you’ll be working with numerous wires that’ll need to be cut once finished, especially when soldering electrical wires. Wire cutters are very handy tools and can be used to cut along the component’s leads or to strip the end of a wire you were using.

With any soldering, it is essential to use your resources. There are many different standards and manuals, training kits and aids, and certifications that will help your soldering process. EPTAC holds numerous soldering certification courses, including  Advanced Micro SMT Hand Soldering, Hand Soldering Certification, and J-STD-001 Instructor, Specialist, and Standard Expert training. All taught by experts who know the industry inside and out. Further your education in soldering with one of EPTAC’s training courses today.

About EPTAC
EPTAC is an internationally recognized leader in solder training and IPC certification, providing professionals with the skills to accelerate their careers, and businesses, the talent to succeed. For over 30 years, EPTAC has been helping corporations increase quality standards, improve productivity, and maximize profits. With nineteen (19) locations in North America, EPTAC continues to expand its offerings and exceptional instructional staff to provide easy access to knowledge and skill-based programs when and where industry demands it. Access our scheduled programs through our website or schedule your own corporate on-site training. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.

The Importance of IPC-A-610 Certification

November 19th, 2021

An IPC-A-610 Certification conveys that you have knowledge of, and conform to, industry standards when it comes to soldering components. With your certification, you can demonstrate to clients and employers that you understand the quality requirements necessary for building reliable electronic assemblies. Benefits to receiving this certification may include building consistent products, improving cross-channel communications, and reducing costs.

Building Consistent Product
It’s no surprise that consistency is key to profitability and industry success. When receiving an IPC-A-610 Certification, you will be given guidelines to specific standards for visually inspecting to assure a quality product when reviewing electronic assemblies. In order to guarantee optimal production symmetry and cooperation, an organization’s level of central consistency should reflect the best practices of their industry.

Ultimately, if one is looking to achieve satisfaction and continual business from consumers, obtaining consistency in their manufacturing methods and final product specifications will have a positive correlation in them achieving that goal.

Improving Cross-Channel Communications
Streamlining cross-channel interaction is crucial to assuring that one’s overall production time and coordination are improved. Without it, miscommunication can occur, leading to inconsistency and delayed production. The OEM and EMS industries have made it imperative that vendors and manufacturers use the same terminology and practice the same standards. When obtaining an IPC-A-610 certification, one can ensure that this is the case. Countless employees and managers from all sides of supply channels have confirmed that an IPC-A-610 certification benefits one in cross-channel communication and will attribute to their success. To some degree, they’ll be able to understand and speak the same language. When a company can produce consistently and streamline cross-communication and interaction, what follows is an organic reduction in production costs.

Reducing Costs
The requirements laid out in an IPC-A-610 course ensures that each product is evaluated and serviced under the same inspection as others at every stage in the assembly line process. This process will improve production time and, more importantly, reduce costs by decreasing the number of rebuilds and reworks.

How EPTAC Can Help You
EPTAC offers an array of IPC-A-610 courses to assist one when preparing for their IPC Certification exam. Lasting between three to four days, EPTAC provides well-informed courses for individuals looking to become an IPC-A-610 Instructor, Specialist, or Standard Expert, all taught by subject matter experts.

An IPC-A-610 certification not only enables one’s company to become a trusted provider throughout their industry but also allows for future business growth. When one receives or renews their IPC-A-610 certification, they’ll find that their ability to accurately produce a consistent, high-quality product and the communication between vendors and manufacturers in their specific supply chain will become significantly more straightforward.

About EPTAC
EPTAC is an internationally recognized leader in solder training and IPC certification, providing professionals with the skills to accelerate their careers, and businesses, the talent to succeed. For over 30 years, EPTAC has been helping corporations increase quality standards, improve productivity, and maximize profits. With nineteen (19) locations in North America, EPTAC continues to expand its offerings and exceptional instructional staff to provide easy access to knowledge and skill-based programs when and where industry demands it. Access our scheduled programs through our website or schedule your own corporate on-site training. For information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.

How to Build on Your Career in Soldering

November 2nd, 2021

With the recent growth of the electrical manufacturing industry, now is the perfect time for someone looking to build on their current career in soldering.

Soldering technicians are essential when it comes to manufacturing technological goods. For example, many household and personal devices that you use each and every day like cell phones, televisions, app-enabled devices like thermostats, doorbells and security systems all are made from numerous components like resistors, transistors, capacitors, integrated circuits and LEDs in a variety of shapes, packaging, and sizes. By using soldering techniques these components are joined into the electronics we use continually.

As with any job, a career in soldering requires training. Some companies are willing to provide training to their employees, but many require job candidates to have their own IPC certification before being considered for employment or promotions. To ensure that you have a leg up on the competition, you should look to complete your solder training and certification before entering the electrical manufacturing job market.

One of the best ways to boost your value as a soldering technician and give your career in soldering a kickstart is to become an IPC Certified Trainer (CIT). Becoming a CIT allows you to work within your company training and certifying technician-level Certified IPC Specialist (CIS) candidates.

With IPC being the standard within the electronics manufacturing industry when it comes to industry-specific standards, guidelines for production and inspection processes and industry-specific terminology, being IPC certified and having your IPC CIT trainer level certification are the best ways to help build your career in soldering.

According to ZipRecruiter, the national average salary for an IPC Trainer is $48,430 annually. Meanwhile, the average salary per year for a solderer is only $30,266. If you are looking for the best way to boost your career in the industry, maximize your earning potential and reach new goals, earning your IPC certification is the best place to start.

Over the past 30 years, EPTAC has become an industry leader for people looking to build on their careers in the soldering industry. With over 19 locations across North America, EPTAC has classes at times that are convenient for students looking to build careers in soldering, while maintaining their regular work schedules.

EPTAC is also recognized as an international leader when it comes to providing professionals with the skills necessary to accelerate their careers, businesses, and talent to succeed in the industry. So, if you’re looking to begin, or advance, your career in soldering, the first step you should take is enrolling in one of EPTAC’s solder training, or IPC certification courses, to not only maintain the soldering skills you may have but gain the knowledge and advanced techniques that you’ll need to succeed in this ever-changing industry.

About EPTAC

Whether you are just beginning your career in soldering, or if you’re a seasoned veteran looking for rectification, the folks at EPTAC are here to help you with your solder training and IPC certification needs. For over 30 years, EPTAC has provided professionals with the tools and training they need to advance their careers and improve their businesses. With 19 locations across North America, our solutions and instructional staff provide easy access to knowledge that will enhance your business model and help you meet and exceed industry demands. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.

Industry Growth Means More Soldering Jobs in Electrical and Electronics Manufacturing

November 2nd, 2021

The next time you are out and about in public, if you take a look around it won’t be hard to see how much the use of technology and electronic devices has increased in our daily lives, both inside and outside the home. Many people carry multiple devices with them daily and leave even more gaming devices, laptops, and tablets at home. The technology industry is currently experiencing massive growth on a global scale, and this growth means that more soldering and assembly jobs are being created in the electrical and electronics industry requiring even more companies to evaluate their staff and increase the hiring of IPC certified soldering technicians.

According to a study done by Maximize Market Research, the global electronic contract manufacturing and design services market was valued at $375 billion in 2017, and by 2026 it is expected to reach $665.32 billion. That growth is massive and due in huge part to the technological advancements being made today and the continued proliferation of the internet and associated devices across the globe. Every year, new devices are produced, existing products are enhanced with new features, and industry and the consumer continue to acquire them and, where needed, upgrade to the latest and greatest technology.

It’s this continued and growing demand for access to the internet that has led to the increased need for soldering jobs in electrical and electronics manufacturing. In fact, the industry is currently growing to the point that many original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are beginning to outsource their current manufacturing demands if they have not already. With massive growth within the industry, the need for IPC certified professionals will continue to grow as well.

According to Glassdoor, the average Manufacturing Electrical/Electronics Engineer’s salary is $86,153. Becoming an IPC certified soldering professional—one who is capable of building and overseeing the assembly processes necessary to produce these electronic devices—is the perfect way to set yourself apart from the competition in the job market.

By choosing to become IPC certified, you will be training to the most widely recognized industry standards when it comes to electrical and electronics manufacturing. Everyone from designers to suppliers, to OEMs speak in IPC terminology and follow the standards and practices adopted from and defined by the IPC. Already being trained and certified as a Certified Standards Expert (CSE), Certified IPC Specialist (CIS) or Certified IPC Trainer (CIT) is the best way to stand out in the job market and show employers that you have the skills to succeed in this growing electrical and electronics manufacturing industry.

If you are looking to become IPC certified, the best place to start is with EPTAC. With over 30 years of experience, EPTAC has become the industry leader for anyone looking to build on their career in soldering. With 19 locations across North America and classes that are conveniently located with dates to fit into your schedule, there’s no better option when it comes to getting IPC certified.

About EPTAC

Whether you are just beginning your career in soldering, or if you’re a seasoned veteran looking for rectification, the folks at EPTAC are here to help you with your solder training and IPC certification needs. For over 30 years, EPTAC has provided professionals with the tools and training they need to advance their careers and improve their businesses. With 19 locations across North America, our solutions and instructional staff provide easy access to knowledge that will enhance your business model and help you meet and exceed industry demands. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.

Four Levels of IPC Certification: How to Choose the Right Certification for Your Career

November 2nd, 2021

Within the soldering and electronics manufacturing industry, consistency and quality are key. As electronics become more advanced and the product and assemblies become more intricate, it has become apparent that within the industry that standardization is necessary in order to produce products that meet and exceed consumer standards. This is where the IPC comes in.

The IPC is a trade association with the goal of bringing together designers, board manufacturers, assembly companies, suppliers and original equipment manufacturers in order to further their competitive excellence and financial success. They have achieved this by standardizing the assembly and production requirements of electronic equipment and assemblies within the electronics manufacturing industry.

Currently, there are four levels of IPC certification, each level with its own benefits depending on your current experience and role within your company. They are listed below in order of increasing level of expertise.

Certified IPC Specialist (CIS)
The CIS certification provides candidates with a consistent understanding of the design or production criteria within a particular standard. For example, this level of training and certification would greatly benefit assemblers, line operators, supervisors, engineers, and quality personnel who are looking to expand their knowledge and ability within a specific standard used in the electronics manufacturing industry.

Certified Standards Expert (CSE)
A CSE is a subject matter professional who possesses a high level of knowledge and understanding towards a specific IPC standard or group of standards. This certification focuses on detailed knowledge of a particular standard rather than skill development and is validated by rigorous timed testing to demonstrate a fluid knowledge of the materials. There are several different IPC standards that one can become certified in, such as IPC-A-610, J-STD-001, and IPC-6012. Candidates that receive CSE status possess the ability to navigate the IPC standards quickly and efficiently, act as a subject matter expert on all matters related to the standard and apply the standard and their knowledge to specific company needs.

Certified IPC Trainer (CIT)

The CIT level certification is aimed at those who are interested in or have the need to train others as a CIS at their company. This can also include faculty members of education and training institutions with a need to certify students as CIS’s as part of a curriculum, or Licensed Training Center employees who have not met the criteria for being Master IPC Trainers (MIT’s). CIT’s are authorized to deliver and administer CIS level training and certification exams to those who are attempting to gain IPC certification.

Master IPC Trainer (MIT)
Of the four levels of IPC certification, an MIT is considered the highest. Once this advanced IPC training has been completed, an MIT can train CIT’s and CIS’s and provide the first level of technical and administrative support to their trainees. Only employees of Licensed Training Centers may become MIT’s. A separate MIT credential is required for each IPC program and the MIT certification is directly tied to a single employing Training Center unless otherwise approved by IPC.

There is a simple difference between the four levels of IPC certification. The first two levels of certification, CIS and CSE, are designed to increase an individual’s knowledge within a certain standard and help make them a subject matter expert. This is excellent for soldering technicians and operators who are looking to find careers within the electronics manufacturing industry. The latter two levels of certification, CIT and MIT, are required to be certified to teach an IPC standard to others looking to become IPC certified.

Your certification needs largely depend on your role within your company and where you would like your career in the soldering and electrical manufacturing industry to go in the future. If you are looking to expand your knowledge within a certain standard or would like to teach a standard within your company, EPTAC is an industry leader in IPC certifications. With over 19 locations across North America, EPTAC has classes at dates and locations that are convenient for students looking to take the next step in their career. By enrolling in one of EPTAC’s solder training or IPC certification courses you’ll gain the knowledge and skills that you need to succeed in an expanding electronics manufacturing industry.

About EPTAC
Whether you are just beginning your career in soldering, or if you’re a seasoned veteran looking for rectification, the folks at EPTAC are here to help you with your solder training and IPC certification needs. For over 30 years, EPTAC has provided professionals with the tools and training they need to advance their careers and improve their businesses. With 19 locations across North America, our solutions and instructional staff provide easy access to knowledge that will enhance your business model and help you meet and exceed industry demands. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.

The Benefits of Becoming an IPC Certified Soldering Technician

November 2nd, 2021

In soldering and electrical manufacturing, the IPC is considered the gold standard when it comes to the standardization, assembly and production requirements of electronic equipment and assemblies. Being an IPC certified soldering technician can open many doors during your career, and companies who employ IPC certified soldering technicians are trusted throughout the electronics manufacturing industry.

The IPC is a trade association whose goal is to standardize the assembly and production requirements of electronic equipment and assemblies. They carry out this goal by bringing together designers, board manufacturers, assembly companies, suppliers and original equipment manufacturers to further their competitive excellence and financial success.

In other words, IPC works with companies and people from across the electronics manufacturing industry and has set the standard in the industry for consistency and quality to support the industry’s continued growth.

What are the Benefits of Becoming an IPC Certified Soldering Technician?
Becoming an IPC certified soldering technician at any level is incredibly important when it comes to finding a job within the electronics manufacturing industry. The reason for this is simple, companies value consistency. Electronics manufacturing companies must create products with consistent quality and employees who have been trained in IPC certified courses are better prepared to follow industry-specific standards and guidelines during production and inspection processes. By ensuring that all of their employees have the same training, companies are better able to maintain quality and consistency in their manufacturing methods.

Given that the IPC is considered the standard for training within the electronics manufacturing industry, you’ll find that many professionals and vendors within the industry all communicate using the same IPC-based terminology. If you are unable to understand the industry-specific terminology being used, this can cause production delays or serious miscommunications in the manufacturing process.

Why You Should Become IPC Certified Soldering Technician
As we’ve discussed, IPC certification is considered the standard within the electronics manufacturing industry. If you are looking for a way to advance your career in this industry becoming an IPC certified soldering technician will give you a head start when reentering the job market.

If you are looking to become IPC certified or would like to schedule group training for your employees, then the knowledgeable professionals at EPTAC are exactly who you’re looking for.

About EPTAC

Whether you are just beginning your career in soldering, or if you’re a seasoned veteran looking for rectification, the folks at EPTAC are here to help you with your solder training and IPC certification needs. For over 30 years, EPTAC has provided professionals with the tools and training they need to advance their careers and improve their businesses. With 19 locations across North America, our solutions and instructional staff provide easy access to knowledge that will enhance your business model and help you meet and exceed industry demands. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.

The Benefits of Becoming a Certified IPC Trainer (CIT)

October 25th, 2021

The road to becoming a Certified IPC Trainer (CIT) can help you take the next step towards your individual career goals. This blog will explain what CIT level certification is, the benefits of having this level of certification, and how a CIT certification will advance your career in the electrical and electronics manufacturing industry.

What is the Certified IPC Trainer Program?
The CIT level certification is aimed at those who are interested in demonstrating knowledge of the most widely recognized standards published by IPC within their parent company. CITs are authorized to deliver and administer Certified IPC Specialist (CIS) training and certification exams to those who are attempting to gain IPC certification.

Becoming a Certified IPC Trainer requires taking a certified training program in the IPC specifications you are interested in teaching. In this training program, you will review IPC supplied instructional materials and take exams to ensure a full understanding of the material and the standards. After the course, if you have completed all the required materials and achieved a passing score on the exams, you will become a CIT.

Is Becoming a Certified IPC Trainer Right for You?
Certified IPC Trainer programs are ideal for people who possess electronics manufacturing industry experience and are excited to teach the IPC standards and specifications to others. Given that this is a trainer certification, teaching is a primary component of becoming a Certified IPC Trainer and the personal qualities and skills one might need to educate others, such as being a strong communicator, should be considered before taking the course. If you’re not interested in teaching and certifying others, the Certified IPC Trainer program may not be the perfect match for you.

Becoming a Certified IPC Trainer allows you to participate in the IPC’s “Train the Trainer” program, a two-tiered approach conducted by Certified IPC Trainers to certify successful trainees. Upon successful completion of this program, candidates will earn the Certified IPC Trainer credential, making them extremely valuable to companies that have trouble finding workers who are already IPC certified. Becoming a Certified IPC Trainer is also useful for individuals that might consider a career as an independent consultant or with a training institution.

You can qualify to receive certified IPC training so long as your job responsibilities require an eye for quality, acceptability, and reliability of assemblies. Ideal candidates include current quality assurance engineers or manufacturing supervisors. Becoming a Certified IPC Trainer is an excellent way to provide additional value to your company, whether you are applying for a job or looking for added responsibilities and an opportunity for growth within your firm.

The Certified IPC Trainer credential is valid for two years after the completion date of the course. After two years, the individual will no longer be able to conduct IPC training until they have been recertified at an IPC-authorized training center.

If you are interested in becoming a Certified IPC Trainer, EPTAC has over 30 years of experience in IPC certifications and is the industry leader for anyone looking to build on their career in soldering. With 19 convenient locations across North America and a variety of dates to fit into your schedule, there’s no better option to become IPC certified.

About EPTAC
Whether you are just beginning your career in soldering, or if you’re a seasoned veteran looking for rectification, the folks at EPTAC are here to help you with your solder training and IPC certification needs. For over 30 years, EPTAC has provided professionals with the tools and training they need to advance their careers and improve their businesses. With 19 locations across North America, our solutions and instructional staff provide easy access to knowledge that will enhance your business model and help you meet and exceed industry demands. For more information call 800

How to Become a Certified IPC Specialist (CIS)

October 1st, 2021

IPC, an electronics manufacturing trade association, sets industry wide standards for electronic manufacturing professionals. Electronic manufacturing engineers, line operators, and quality engineers, can become Certified IPC Specialists (CIS) who are proficient in these industry standard documents.

Certified IPC Specialists (CIS) have the choice of being certified in one of these IPC Standards:

  • IPC-A-610, “The Acceptability of Electronic Assemblies”
  • IPC/WHMA-A-620, “Requirements and Acceptance for Cable and Wire Harness Assemblies”
  • J-STD-001, “Requirements for Soldered Electrical & Electronic Assemblies”
  • IPC-7711/7721 “Rework, Modification and Repair of Electronic Assemblies”

IPC-A-610

The IPC-A-610 course covers accept and reject criteria focusing on various aspects relative to the assembly process for Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs). Instructors will cover all three classes of criteria including how they relate to lead and lead-free solders. Coursework also includes component issues, hardware consideration and high voltage issues.

IPC/WHMA-A-620

The IPC/WHMA-A-620 course teaches inspection and assembly criteria for all three classes for cable and wire assemblies. It covers the acceptable and non-acceptable criteria for cable assemblies. Using 600 full color illustrations, students learn the best practice for wire prep, crimping, ultrasonic welding, splicing, molding, lacing, and shielding among other valuable skills. After completing this certification, students have the option of taking a one-day EPTAC hands-on Cable Wire Harness Lab to build an actual cable assembly.

J-STD-001

The J-STD-001 course reviews the materials, methods, and acceptable conditions of soldered electrical and electronic assemblies. This five-day course has both lecture and hands-on lab work components. Modules include Wire and Terminals, Through-Hole and Surface Mount technologies in both lead and lead-free environments.  Students will gain real life experience in accept and reject criteria from building electronic assemblies.

IPC-7711/7721

The IPC-7711/7721 course focuses on the criteria for reworking or repairing electronic assemblies. The IPC-7711 standard covers restoring Printed Circuit Boards to their original design and the IPC-7721 standard covers restoring a board’s functional capability. This five-day course is 80 percent hands on lab work. Students will review several techniques for repair and rework including Through-Hole and Surface Mount procedures. The course also goes over several board level repair techniques including laminate and conductor repair.

After successfully completing a CIS program, participants will receive an IPC Certificate of Training. Certified IPC Specialists can take additional courses to become certified trainers for these standards. Certified trainers can teach these courses to employees in their own facilities and issue IPC certifications to ensure employees are getting the training they need to further their career.

As an industry leader in IPC Certification, EPTAC offers virtual and in person courses and workshops throughout the United States.

About EPTAC

EPTAC is an internationally recognized leader in solder training and IPC certification, providing professionals with the skills to accelerate their careers, and businesses, the talent to succeed. For over 30 years, EPTAC has been helping corporations increase quality standards, improve productivity, and maximize profits. With nineteen (19) locations in North America, EPTAC continues to expand its offerings and exceptional instructional staff to provide easy access to knowledge and skill-based programs when and where industry demands it. Access our scheduled programs through our website or schedule your own corporate on-site training. For more information call 800.643.7822 or contact us.